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LUKE

Editor. Tracks magazine.

Bondi Beach. Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you remember what you wanted to do with your life

when you were young?

 

To be honest I didn’t really know what I wanted to do.

I knew I liked surfing and I liked reading and writing.

I figured if I stuck to what I loved something would

evolve that enabled me to be immersed in both my passions.

On the surface it looks like I got lucky and in many ways I did.

However, I still went to university and completed an education

degree and taught as a casual for a while before the right job

came along. I also used my initiative and submitted articles to

Tracks all the way through university. I didn’t aim at the job but

I’d done what was required to earn the position when it came

up. It’s true that it makes sense to stick to what you love but

that doesn’t mean you don’t have to do a few other things

along the way.         

 

What was the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

 

Two pieces of advice stand out.

 

First: My father once said that no piece of learning is useless. What he meant was that every scrap of life experience, broader reading, formal education or challenge you’ve faced might be useful or necessary in the very next moment or thing that life throws at you. I guess in a more clichéd sense it might be paraphrased as meaning make the most of the cards you’ve been dealt and don’t dismiss anything or anyone. Life is fundamentally about taking things from the past and making them useful in the future.

 

Second: I worked in a supermarket for a year after school.

It was the second worst job (and I’ve had many small jobs) I’ve ever done. A Russian guy I worked with was pretty bright. He’d grown up in communist Russia but made money on the black market on the side. One day I was complaining about all the boxes we had to unpack. He looked at me and said earnestly, “Do not fear long work.” The way he said it, it sounded like something he’d been told repeatedly in a Russian classroom, a kind of Marxist Maxim. For some reason it resonated and still does.       

 

Which part of your job gives you the most satisfaction.

My job is pretty dynamic. I have to deal with ad salesmen, pay people, be on the phone, email, photos, videos, internet posts, trip planning, content planning and people management.

I feel like I’m constantly chasing my tale so I love the singular focus of writing a story and still get more satisfaction out of a good sentence than any of the above.    

 

If you have worked with any recent grads. What skills do you believe recent university graduates are lacking (if any) today and what strengths do they bring?

Most Grads lack the basics. They don’t read enough and they don’t write well enough. If you want to write reasonably well you have to read a lot - and I don’t mean facebook accounts.

Books, newspapers and magazines are still the best fuel for the creative brain. You can read them online, but if you are not reading some content beyond single paragraphs and blog posts you are not really reading.

 

This sounds all a bit old school but talking face to face is a really efficient form of communication and the telephone is a wonderful invention - far greater an invention than the internet and certainly email.

Do a drama class, learn to think and talk on your feet. Then you don’t need Anthony Robins. If you are writing an email ask yourself if the problem could be better solved by picking up the phone. An email is a conversation. It will stretch out.    

      

If you realise it’s a conversation you will understand you can only have so many conversations in a day.

 

 

What one piece of advice would you give to your 15-year-old self or younger generations still at school today?

At 15 you might not know what you want but find out what you are good at and start honing in on that. You can do a few things in life well but you need to specialise in something.

 

Did you have any jobs as a teenager?

I worked as a pool attendant and at a surf shop in my holidays. I probably should have had a better work ethic when I was younger. My surf ethic was pretty good.  

 

Did you enjoy school?

There were times at school when I felt invincible and like every facet of my life - sport, education, social, even spiritual – was working in harmony and I was also doing well in all of them. The final years of high school weren’t as much fun. You get hung up on the fact they are supposed to be the best years of your life so you get disappointed if they are not. The last couple of years are about a lot of work. You can’t avoid that. Working hard at school just buys you time and fun later. There is of course a balance though.  

 

How do you believe schools or universities might be changed to be more relevant or effective?

I think the pathway at school could be narrowed a little earlier. By year ten you want to be zoning in. Some of the alternative courses and schools allow you to do that. While the career path can be narrowed earlier I think that allows you to have more of a broader life where sport, social life and outside interests can be nurtured because you are not wasting time on education and subjects that don’t ultimately contribute to your goals and desired destiny.     

 

Final last words..

All you have is your consciousness or state of mind.

That is the sum total of your wealth irrespective of money or status. Be mindful.  

Luke surfing his local break Bondi Beach

photo by www.aquabumps.com

Most Grads lack the basics. They don’t read enough and they don’t write well enough. If you want to write reasonably well you have to read a lot - and I don’t mean facebook accounts.

Books, newspapers and magazines are still the best fuel for the creative brain. You can read them online, but if you are not reading some content beyond single paragraphs and blog posts you are not really reading